J Korean Soc Hazard Mitig 2018; 18(1): 179-184  https://doi.org/10.9798/KOSHAM.2018.18.1.179
Automated Rainfall Warning System Standards Setting Using GIS
Kim, Younghwan*, Tak, Wonjun**, and Jun, Kyewon***
*Member, Ph.D. Course, Graduate School of Disaster Prevention, Kangwon National University
**Member, Ph.D. Course, Graduate School of Disaster Prevention, Kangwon National University
***Member, Professor, Graduate School of Disaster Prevention, Kangwon National University
Correspondence to: Member, Ph.D. Course, Graduate School of Disaster Prevention, Kangwon National University (Tel: +82-33-570-6447, Fax: +82-33-540-3139, E-mail: wjtak@kangwon.ac.kr)
Received: September 30, 2017; Revised: October 18, 2017; Accepted: November 20, 2017; Published online: January 31, 2018.
© The Korean Society of Hazard Mitigation. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Flash floods that occur near mountainous streams can cause huge losses of life they form high-level flood waves within a short period. Such areas are required to secure the systems for flash flood forecasting/warning and rainfall alert that take into consideration the local conditions. In this respect, the study built a rainfall–runoff model using GIS and used the Mannings equation to calculate the trigger runoff in the stream channel, where the runoff threshold depth that can cause losses of life at the mountainous stream area is determined as 0.5 m. Regarding the peak flow at the basin, the study calculated the available rainfall by using the area’s topographic characteristics and Geomorphologic Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (GIUH) parameters, which reflects the characteristics of mountainous areas well. In the study basin, the Baekcheon Valley at Mt. Tabaek, the trigger runoff was 10.9 ㎥/s and 10.2 ㎥/s, respectively, at Warning Station No. 1 and Warning Station No. 2, for 0.5 m of the runoff threshold depth. In this condition, the optimal estimation scale of rainfall depth for alert issue was 13 mm (warning), 14 mm (evacuation stage 1), and 15 mm (evacuation stage 2) at Warning Station No. 1, while 12 mm (warning), 13 mm (evacuation stage 1), and 14 mm (evacuation stage 2) at Warning Station No. 2.
Keywords: GIS, GIUH, Flash Floods, Warning Criteria


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